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Puncherson_64LadyBrain_64

Because we do occasionally look up from the game

Butch:

You gonna watch the sun go out?

Feminina:

I didn’t get any eclipse glasses, so I can’t really look at it, but I figure I’ll at least go outside and admire the general effect for a couple of minutes. We’re getting 75% or something, right? Should still get some interesting twilight.

You? That could keep the children busy for about a minute and a half. In between fighting over the glasses and causing themselves to go blind by staring up while you’re not paying attention.

Daycare sent a note that they’re just keeping the kids inside, rather than risk it. Kind of too bad, it would be fun for them to see, but I can obviously understand them not wanting to be responsible for protecting the vision of 20 5-year-olds who may or may not remember to use weird glasses (plus, I understand them not wanting to buy the glasses for all the parents who didn’t think to do it).

Butch:

Probably wise. Don’t blind the class.

We got glasses. Remember, Junior is space/physics obsessed. No WAY he wasn’t gonna see this.

Feminina:

Awesome. That will be cool to share with him.

I could see O’Jr. being into it in a couple of years, but not at the moment. At least he won’t be sad because he missed out–I don’t think he’s even aware of it.

Butch:

Probably good. These happen, like, what, every 99 years?

Feminina:

Well, I think technically every few years, but usually over the ocean where no one sees them. I think over large inhabited spaces they’re very rare and usually a long time apart, but I heard there’s actually another one that will be visible from the U.S. in seven years? (Ask Jr., he’ll probably know!) So mine will both be old enough by then to perhaps care, and maybe I’ll remember in time to get the glasses. Heh.

And you, save those glasses. You might be able to use them again before the turn of the next century!

Butch:

[later]

Gotta admit, it’s pretty cool.

Feminina:

I borrowed a stranger’s eclipse glasses to take a peek. Was pretty cool. Funny how even with as much of the sun as was covered, it was still clearly daylight out–you wouldn’t necessarily have noticed anything was different if you weren’t paying attention. Just goes to show how much sunlight we normally get, if we can lose that much and barely notice without looking right at it.

Lots of people had made those at-home box viewers. I don’t know how well they worked…we’ll have the kids try it in seven years.

April 8, 2024, man. Get ready.

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